Comprehensive Cubicle Curtain Program

Rental and Laundry Program for Improved Safety and Infection Prevention

With the ongoing emphasis on infection prevention, it won’t surprise you that about 1 in 25 US hospital patients contract at least one healthcare-associated infection (HAI)1, costing upwards of $45 billion each year2 according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Studies demonstrate that up to 40% of HAIs can be traced to the contamination of healthcare staff’s hands3. Therefore, it’s not surprising to hear that hospital privacy curtains are rapidly and frequently contaminated
with potentially dangerous bacteria.

Laundering cubicle curtains is effective at keeping patient surroundings safe if done in accordance with OSHA regulations to properly remove bacteria – but changing curtains can be time-consuming. How can hospitals manage their curtains and labor costs effectively while maintaining safety?

ImageFIRST’s innovative and comprehensive Cubicle Curtain Rental and Laundry Program includes:

  • Management and terminal cleaning of cubicle curtains that exceed infection prevention standards
  • All new curtains with no upfront costs
  • A fully-managed laundry service of curtains and standard-sized panels for inventory management ease
  • Improved safety for patients and staff with specially-designed curtains easily changed in seconds without a ladder or special tools
  • In-field scanning for digital tracking and infection prevention documentation

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REFERENCES:
1. www.cdc.gov/hai/surveillance/ 
2. Scott II, R. D. (March 2009) The Direct Medical Costs of Healthcare-Associated Infections in U.S. Hospitals and the Benefits of Prevention. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Retrieved August 2, 2016 from www.cdc.gov/HAI/pdfs/hai/Scott_CostPaper.pdf 
3. Weber, D.J., Anderson, D., Rutala, W.A. (2013) The Role of the Surface Environment in Healthcare-Associated Infections. Current Opinion in Infectious Diseases, 26(4). 338-344.